White Balance for Landscape Photographs – Part 3: A Special Problem

White Balance for Landscape Photographs – Part 3: A Special Problem from Michael Frye on Vimeo.

Here’s the third part of my video series on white balance, where I present solutions to a common problem in landscape photographs—finding the right white balance when mixing low-angle sunlight with blue sky.

If you haven’t seen them already, here are links to Part 1 and Part 2.

To see this video clearly, be sure that “HD” is on (the letters “HD” should be white instead of gray; if not, click on them), and click the “expand” icon just to the right of “HD.”

Hope you find this helpful; I look forward to hearing your comments! And if you like the video, please share the link.

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9 Responses to “White Balance for Landscape Photographs – Part 3: A Special Problem”

  1. vern denman says:

    You are truly a great teacher. I have been taking pictures for years and somehow got lost in all the verbose about digital. I am trying to catch up and you really helping me do that. Thanks so much. I am trying to purchase Light and Land eBook and will as soon as I can figure out how to order it.

    • Michael Frye says:

      Thanks very much Vern! I appreciate the kind words. It should be easy to purchase Light & Land – there’s a link underneath the picture of it on the right side of this page, and then just click “Buy the PDF.” You’ll need a PayPal account, but it’s easy to set one up if you haven’t already.

  2. paul evans says:

    Very interesting tutorial, many thanks. For those without full photoshop (I have LR3 and PSE9), could you adjust the sky in a similar way using the Lightroom brush tools? – for example having made the sky too yellow by a global colour temperature adjustment, could you “restore” the sky using a blue brush in Lightroom? (or a Lightroom grad filter if the horizon was straighter?).
    I do appreciate the selective colour in Photoshope offers finer control of the CYMK channels, and smart objects look very cool for those who have both LR and full photoshop!
    Thanks again
    Paul

    • Michael Frye says:

      Thanks Paul. You can’t adjust the sky (and water) in quite the same way using Lightroom, but the approach you mention – using the Adjustment Brush with a color tint – comes fairly close. While it would be fairly easy to apply a tint to the sky with the Adjustment Brush, it would be considerably more difficult to add that same tint to the blue parts of the water. So the Selective Color tool is much easier, but you can accomplish sort of the same thing in Lightroom. Another trick is just boost the saturation of the blues in the HSL panel, which will help unmuddy those blues a bit.

  3. [...] Jan 6: White Balance for Landscape Photographs – Part 3: A Special Problem [...]

  4. Dave Freeman says:

    Just wanted to say, Thanks Michael for taking the time to publish tees tutorials, they really help! I have been struggling sometime with digital, especially the digital darkroom. I have purchased you publication, books and download recently, still going through them…

    Been on a couple of workshops, one in Yosemite and one around the Death Valley area with Alan Ross, great guy, but these where concentrating mainly on film work – I will be coming to Yosemite for one of your workshop I think!

    Question: do you do your own printing of photographs, if so what printers do you use, I just recently purchased a Epson 3880, hopefully this will suffice!

    Thanks,

    Dave.

    • Michael Frye says:

      You’re very welcome Dave, and I’m glad you found this information helpful.

      Yes, I do my own printing on an Epson 9600. The 3880 is a great printer, so I’m sure you’ll be happy with it.

  5. federico bonfiglio says:

    Thank you very much, this video helped me a lot. I had the same problem in many photographs but now i know how to manage it properly.

    Also congratulations for your works, a truly impressive light management.

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